The History Of Green Tea

The History Of Green Tea China During the Song Dynasty (960–1279 AD), production and preparation of tea changed throughout China. Even then, people were looking for convenience; a new form of tea emerged as a result of people wanting more and more tea without having to take the time to brew the leaves. The tea leaves were picked and quickly steamed to preserve their color and fresh character. After steaming, the leaves were dried. The finished tea was then ground into fine powders that were whisked in wide bowls. The resulting beverage resembled what we know of today as instant tea — you mixed the tea powder with hot water and voilà! Your tea was ready in an instant.

This tea was highly regarded for its deep emerald or iridescent white appearance and its rejuvenating and healthy energy. This style of tea preparation, using powdered tea and ceramic ware, became known as the Song tea ceremony. Although it later became extinct in China, this Song style of tea evolved into what is now the Japanese tea ceremony that endures still today.

Today, there are between 12,500 and 20,000 green teas produced in China alone (although they are named and renamed so many times — for no apparent reason — that no one knows exactly how many there are). It is similar to wine in that respect. There are thousands of vineyards that produce wines; not all of them make it to market, or are meant to do so. It’s the same with tea in China. There are thousands of individual tea plantations and each produces its own variety of tea. Some are meant only for an individual farmer’s consumption; others may be distributed in a local area; and still others are grown for the commercial market and shipped worldwide.

As with white tea, the bud and leaves for green tea are picked, cleaned, and dried. The tea leaves then undergo a minimal amount of oxidation. Green tea has very low levels of caffeine, and derives its distinctive, healthy good flavor from the area in which it is grown and the techniques used to produce the tea.

The processing sequence for green tea is:

1. Leaves and buds are harvested.

2. Leaves and buds are cleaned.

3. Leaves and buds are dried.

4. In Japan, the leaves are steamed, which stops any fermentation.

5. In China, the leaves are placed in very hot woks to stop any fermentation.

6. The tea is then rolled, cut, ground, or shaped into a form uniquely associated with the plantation on which it is grown.

Dragon’s Well is the most famous of Chinese green teas; it grows on the peaks of the Tieh Mu (t’yeh MOO) mountain range. Chinese mythology tells us that the dragon is the king of the waters. History tells us that in 250 AD, there was a drought at the Dragon’s Well monastery. A monk prayed to the dragon, pleading for rain. His prayers were immediately answered, and the tea produced there received its name.

Note: Feel free to republish this article on your own blog or website but please copy paste the below ‘Author Credits’ and include it at the bottom of your post or page. Thank you. 

About The Author

Dr. Leroy Rebello is a well established and internationally qualified anti-aging consultant and cosmetologist from Mumbai and a director in Eternesse – the best skin clinic in Mumbai. He lectures in reputed Institutions such as AIIMS, JIPMER and other Medical Colleges around India. With over 10 Research Papers published in Indexed Journals, Dr. Rebello is continuously researching and developing new treatments and cures. 

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The Role Of Vitamin A in Preventing Hair Loss

Best Hair Loss Centre For Men WomenOne key factor in maintaining a growing protein on a part of one’s biological body is obvious: one must maintain a healthy diet. Although certain factors have been definitely identified as contributors to hair loss, we must keep in mind that hair is part of the complete biological system of the human body. Being a system, dysfunctions in one part of the system can contribute to dysfunctions in other parts; chain reactions occur when one part of the body malfunctions, causing other parts within the system to falter.

To maintain optimum health, it is best to maintain a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen. Defining exactly what a healthy diet is when it comes to preventing hair loss can be a little more complex. Principally, the main vitamins, minerals, and nutrients that one must ingest in some form to maintain healthy hair are vitamin A, all B  vitamins – particularly vitamins B-6 and B-12, folic acid, biotin, vitamin C, vitamin E, copper, iron, zinc, iodine, protein of course, silica, essential fatty acids (EFA’s, formerly known as vitamin F) and last but not least one must consume water.

There are also certain foods that may cause dysfunctions that will contribute to hair loss.  The best way to maintain a healthy vitamin and mineral intake is a good diet. It is not necessary or advisable to go out and buy a bunch of over-the-counter vitamin supplements in order to achieve your suggested  nutritional levels. Many over-the-counter vitamins are chemically processed and are not completely absorbed into the system. It is also easy to overdose oneself with over the counter vitamins particularly when taking supplements of fat-soluble vitamins and minerals, causing toxicity and adverse reactions. The likelihood of doing this is far less with food; therefore it is always best to obtain the bulk of your vitamin and mineral requirements from whole foods.

Vitamin A is a key component to developing healthy cells and tissues in the body, including hair. Additionally it works with silica and zinc to prevent drying and clogging of the sebaceous glands, the glands vital to producing sebum, which is an important lubricant for the hair follicle. Vitamin A deficiencies commonly cause thickening of the scalp, dry hair, and dandruff. Air pollution, smoking, extremely bright light, certain cholesterol-lowering drugs, laxatives, and aspirin are some known vitamin A inhibitors. Liver, fish oil, eggs, fortified milk, and red, yellow, and orange vegetables are good sources for vitamin A, as are some dark green leafy vegetables like spinach. Be particularly careful if you take vitamin A supplements, as vitamin A is fat-soluble, allowing the body to store it and making it easy for the body to overdose on vitamin A. Vitamin A overdoses can cause excessively dry skin and inflamed hair follicles, and in some cases ironically can cause hair loss. If you choose to take supplements of this vitamin, consult with a specialist first. As mentioned above, the likelihood of overdosing by achieving your vitamin A intake by food sources is almost nil, so it is best to attempt to achieve this at all costs.

Note: Feel free to republish this article on your own blog or website but please copy paste the below ‘Author Credits’ and include it at the bottom of your post or page. Thank you. 

About The Author

Dr. Leroy Rebello is a well established and internationally qualified anti-aging consultant and cosmetologist from Mumbai and a director in Eternesse – the best skin clinic in Mumbai. He lectures in reputed Institutions such as AIIMS, JIPMER and other Medical Colleges around India. With over 10 Research Papers published in Indexed Journals, Dr. Rebello is continuously researching and developing new treatments and cures. 

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How Metabolism Of Food Occurs Inside Our Bodies

Turning Food Into Nutrients

Digestive System Diagram

How Metabolism Occurs

Vitamins and minerals are critical to body metabolism—the chemical reactions that involve building up or breaking down substances in the body. Metabolism is the process by which the body’s cells modify nutrient molecules and use them to create energy, or as building blocks for new cells and tissues. Metabolism, for any living organism, is life itself. Metabolism comes from a Greek word meaning “change,” and that is what cells do with nutrients. They change the chemical substances from foods into molecules that are needed to do the body’s work. We do not eat nutrients; we eat foods, which are too chemically complex for cells to use. The foods we eat must be broken down into simpler chemical substances—the nutrients—so that they are available to the cells. Foods go through three steps before nutrients are available to the body’s cells. These processes are digestion, absorption, and metabolism.

Digestion begins in the mouth, where teeth and the enzymes in saliva begin breaking down foods. Once in the stomach, food is exposed to gastric juices, and the chemical breakdown turns it into a thick liquid called chyme. Chyme moves to the small intestine. Here, with the help of more chemicals from the pancreas and gallbladder, it is broken down into nutrient components. (Unusable food substances move to the large intestine and are excreted by the body.) The nutrients are now absorbed into the bloodstream through the intestinal walls. Vitamins and minerals can be carried to every cell in the body, via the bloodstream. Amino acids from proteins, glucose from carbohydrates, and fatty acids from fats also are now usable and ready to be metabolized by the cells. The nutrients pass through the cell membranes and into the cells themselves, where more chemical reactions take place.

Metabolism

Once inside the cell, a molecule of glucose is broken down to release its energy. When nutrient molecules are broken down and energy is released, the process is called catabolism. But cells may use energy from nutrients to build more complex molecules, too. For example, a cell membrane may be damaged and need repair. This process is known as anabolism. In this case, people use the “bodies” of potatoes, broccoli, and fish, for instance, to maintain and build up their own bodies. The nutrient material in food is transformed to construct the building blocks of the human body. Scientists say that the nutrients we ingest can be thought of as the metabolic pool used by the cells for construction. Just as carpenters, bricklayers, and roofers use nails, tiles, bricks, mortar, glue, and wood to build a house, cells use the substances from nutrients to construct body parts.

The strength of the house depends on the quality of the building materials; the health of the body depends on the quality of the substances in the metabolic pool. To repair a cell membrane, new protein molecules are needed. These will be built through anabolism, using the amino acids in the metabolic pool. The new protein molecules may consist of hundreds or even thousands of amino acids. Different nutrient molecules may be metabolized in different ways or for different purposes, but all cells’ metabolic processes occur in a similar way. Millions of nutrient molecules are absorbed and utilized with every meal. Many end up as part of the body, although some are excreted from the body as unneeded or unusable. Many of these nutrients, especially vitamins, minerals, and proteins, are used to construct or build up enzymes. Enzymes are the chemicals that control the cellular processes of anabolism and catabolism. They also direct how fast a cell’s chemical reactions take place. Some vitamins protect the cells from damaging themselves as they metabolize nutrients. Nutrients build new bone, muscle, and blood cells in the body. They fuel the cells that make thinking, moving, and breathing possible. They keep bodies alive by continually building new cells as old ones die. Two million red blood cells die and two million are replaced by the blood-manufacturing cells in bone marrow every second. That means an intense, ongoing need for all the proper nutrients.

Note: Feel free to republish this article on your own blog or website but please copy paste the below ‘Author Credits’ and include it at the bottom of your post or page. Thank you. 

Author Bio

best skin hair anti aging clinic mumbai andheriDr. Sunita Banerji received her MBBS degree from The Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, one of India’s leading Medical Institutes and received her DGO credentials in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1982. She started her successful Aesthetic Medicine practice in Lokhandwala, in 1989 after undergoing extensive training in London. She was far ahead of her time in starting this type of practice in India. Eternesse – The Best Skin Treatment Clinic in Mumbai – her brainchild helps treat major medical problems related to lifestyle, aging and cosmetic treatments and surgery.

 

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Some Basic Facts About Your Hair

Know Your Hair

Best Hair Care Clinic in Andheri For Men and Women

Take Care Of Your Hair

Hair is the fastest growing tissue of the body, made up of proteins called keratins. Every strand of hair is made up of three layers:

1. the inner layer or medulla (only present in thick hairs);

2. the middle layer or cortex, which determines the strength, texture, and color of hair;

3. the cuticle, which protects the cortex.

Hair grows from roots, which are enclosed in follicles. Below this is a layer of skin called the dermal papilla, which is fed by the bloodstream carrying nourishments vital to the growth of hair. Only the roots of hair are actually alive, while the visible part of hair is dead tissue, and therefore unable to heal itself. It is vital then to take care of the scalp and body in order to perpetuate hair growth and maintenance. Expensive treatments that claim to treat the visible hair and nourish it therefore are usually no more than bogus claims made to sell products.

Hormones called androgens, usually testosterone, can cause hair follicles to shrink, causing thinning of hair or eventual hair loss. Reportedly only bone marrow grows faster in our body than hair does. The average scalp contains 100,000-150,000 hair follicles and hairs, with 90% growing and 10% resting at any given time.

Hair actually grows in three stages:

1. anagen phase

The anagen phase is the phase where hair is actively growing, and of course this phase is longer for follicles in the scalp than anywhere else on your body, and lasts longer for women than men.

2. catagen phase

It is natural for follicles to atrophy and hair to fall out, and this is called the catagen phase. This phase is only temporary.

3. telogen phase

Eventually the follicle enters the telogen phase where it is resting. These are the 10% at rest mentioned above.

Normal anagen phases last approximately five years, with catagen phases lasting about three weeks, and telogen phases lasting approximately 12 weeks. As you see it is natural to lose some hair. Natural hair loss is considered to be in the range of 100 hairs per day. It is not apparent to most people that hair is actually being lost until more than 50% of a person’s hair is actually lost.

Although both men and women can suffer significant hair loss, over 50% of men will suffer with Male Pattern Baldness (MPB), also known as androgenetic alopecia, at some point in their lives. The reason behind hair loss is a genetically inherited sensitivity to Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5-alpha-reductase. The enzyme 5-alpha-reductase converts testosterone, a male hormone, to DHT, the substance identified as the end-cause for hair loss.

Most hair loss follows a pattern that has been codified in a table called the Norwood Scale shown below:

 

Best Hair Loss Clinic For Men Mumbai

The Norwood Scale

There are seven  patterns of hair identified in the Norwood Scale, Norwood I being a normal head of hair with no visible hair loss, Norwood II showing the hair receding in a wedge-shaped pattern. Norwood III shows the same receding pattern as Norwood II, except the hairline has receded deeper into the frontal area and the temporal area.

Type IV on the Norwood Scale indicates a hairline that has receded more dramatically in the frontal region and temporal area. Additionally there is a balding area at the very top center of the head, but there is a bridge of hair remaining between that region and the front. Type V on the Norwood Scale shows that very same bridge between the frontal region and the top center, also called the vertex, beginning to thin. Type VI on the Norwood Scale indicates that the bridge between the frontal region and the vertex has disappeared. Finally, Type VII on the Norwood Scale shows hair receding all the way back to the base of the head and the sides just above the ears. Norwood patterns are determined genetically.

Note: Feel free to republish this article on your own blog or website but please copy paste the below ‘Author Credits’ and include it at the bottom of your post or page. Thank you. 

About The Author

Dr. Leroy Rebello is a well established and internationally qualified anti-aging consultant and cosmetologist from Mumbai and a director in Eternesse – the best hair and skin clinic in Mumbai. He lectures in reputed Institutions such as AIIMS, JIPMER and other Medical Colleges around India. With over 10 Research Papers published in Indexed Journals, Dr. Rebello is continuously researching and developing new treatments and cures. 


 

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Some Facts About Obesity And Your BMI


Best Online BMI Body Mass Index CalculatorOverweight
and obesity are defined medically as the accumulation of excess fat in the body. The percentage of excess fat  compared to the estimated ideal body weight determines whether a person is overweight or obese. This amount is estimated using the body mass index (BMI), which is a mathematical formula and screening tool that compares height and weight. It is not an exact measure of excess fat, but, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it is a simple and reliable estimate of “body fatness” for most adults. BMI is defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared (BMI=kg/m²).

The formula is converted to pounds and inches as weight divided by height squared, multiplied by 704.5 (BMI=(lb/in2) x 704.5). For example, a person who is 60 inches (1.5 meters) tall and weighs 112 pounds (50.8 kilograms) would have a BMI of 22. A BMI under 25 is considered a normal weight. If that same person weighed 133 pounds (60.3 kg), he or she would have a BMI of 26 and be considered overweight. Overweight is defined as a BMI between 25 and 29.9. If the person weighed 168 pounds (76 kg), he or she would have a BMI of 33 and test as obese. A BMI of 30 or more is considered obese.

If you would like to check your BMI right now, use the calculator below.

[calculatornet_bmi_calculator]

What Is BMI

BMI is a relatively accurate assessment of body weight in adults, but it is inaccurate for children and teens because they are still growing. In the case of young people under about age 20, a  BMI assessment must take into account age and gender, as well as height and weight. Healthy weight in young people can change from month to month as they grow, and it definitely changes from year to year. As an example, a boy with a BMI of 23 might be obese at age 10, but a healthy weight if he is 15.

BMI for children and teens is calculated as it is for adults, but then compared to percentile charts of average height and weight at different ages for boys and girls. A young person with a BMI at or above the 95th percentile is considered obese. This means his or her BMI is higher than 95% of all people of that sex and age. Young people with BMIs between the 85th and 95th percentiles are overweight.

Around the world, the WHO estimates that at least 22 million children under the age of 5 are overweight. In India like much of the developed countries, obesity is becoming a growing problem. Because overweight youth are likely to become overweight or obese adults, many nutritional and medical experts are particularly concerned about the health risks associated with  childhood and teen overnutrition. These experts believe that early onset of obesity puts these young people at grave risk of disability and premature death in the future. In addition, many young people are developing obesity-related diseases that used to occur only in  middle-aged or older adults.

Obese And In Danger

When a person is 100 pounds (45.3 kg) or more over his or her ideal body weight, the condition is referred to as morbid obesity. This is a serious disease. Morbid obesity may also be defined as a BMI of 40 or greater, or as a BMI between 35 and 40 if accompanied by a serious medical problem, such as heart disease, diabetes, or joint pain. A BMI between 45 and 50 is severe morbid obesity. A BMI between 50 and 60 is super-morbid obesity. A BMI greater than 60 is super-super morbid obesity.

People with morbid obesity are at great risk of medical problems and disease if they do not lose weight. If they cannot reduce their weight by any other means, they are often eligible for bariatric surgery. This is weight-loss surgery in which the stomach and intestines are permanently modified.

Surgery Techniques For Obesity

Gastric bypass is one type of bariatric surgery. First, a small pouch is created at the top of the stomach by stapling it off from the rest of the stomach. Then the small intestine is cut so that its first section is no longer connected to the rest of the digestive system. The second section of the small intestine is sewn directly to the stomach pouch.

The pouch is tiny—about the size of a walnut—and can hold only about 1 ounce (28 grams) of food. Calorie absorption also is limited by disconnecting, or bypassing, the first part of the small intestine. Many people experience drastic weight loss with gastric bypass surgery and vastly improve their health, but the risk of malnutrition is high. People take dietary supplements for life and learn a special diet that emphasizes proteins first.

Another bariatric procedure is called lap-band adjustable gastric banding. In this procedure, the doctor partitions the stomach into two parts with a flexible band or belt that creates only a tiny opening between the two parts of the stomach. This can make people feel full after very small meals. It is a simpler procedure than gastric bypass,  but weight loss is not as extreme. In both cases, people who are not completely committed to the weight-loss program can overcome the procedures, gradually stretch their new stomachs, and regain weight. Neither procedure is a miracle cure for obesity, and people have to change their lifestyles permanently to achieve lasting good health and prevent disease.

Note: Feel free to republish this article on your own blog or website but please copy paste the below ‘Author Credits’ and include it at the bottom of your post or page. Thank you. 

About The Author

Dr. Leroy Rebello is a well established and internationally qualified anti-aging consultant and cosmetologist from Mumbai and a director in Eternesse – the best skin clinic in Mumbai. He lectures in reputed Institutions such as AIIMS, JIPMER and other Medical Colleges around India. With over 10 Research Papers published in Indexed Journals, Dr. Rebello is continuously researching and developing new treatments and cures. 

 

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Why You Need Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fats

The Basic Facts About Omega 3

Benefits Of Omega 3 FoodsUnless you live in an isolated bubble or a cave in the Himalayas, you have likely seen the innumerable headline-grabbing studies on omega-3 fats, with their far-reaching benefits from preventing cancer and heart attacks to treating depression and arthritis.

How can one type of fat affect so many different parts of your body (such as your brain and heart) and ultimately influence your health and well-being? There are two key reasons. Firstly, omega-3 fats are really like vitamins (originally called vitamin F when discovered). Unfortunately, the vast majority of Americans are deficient in vitamin F or omega-3 fats.

Second, although few people know it, we have a striking fat imbalance in our diet. Even if you consider yourself health-conscious, you are not likely free of this problem! The problem of this dietary fat imbalance affects you whether you eat heart-healthy, are a strict vegetarian, are a hardcore chicken and protein gulper, or something in between. We eat too much of the so-called heart-healthy fats, which, ironically, interfere with the benefits of omega-3 fats in our bodies.

In short, we have two key problems. We don’t eat enough (and the right kinds) of omega-3 fats. And we eat too much of the so-called healthy fats that hamper omega-3 fat’s benefits.

Omega-3 Fat Is Actually a Vitamin

In the 1920s, one of the several omega-3 fats was discovered. The researchers determined that it is essential for health and  met the scientific criteria to be called a vitamin. Appropriately, this fat was named “vitamin F.” Yet you probably haven’t heard of vitamin F. Why not? You can rule out omega-3’s fatty nature as the reason it lacks “vitamin status,” because there are other fat-based vitamins: vitamins A, D, E, and K. At the time of the vitamin F discovery, vitamin E also had just been discovered. Because of the scientific excitement over the newly discovered vitamin E, vitamin F was ignored and disappeared into oblivion (until the last decade). Although research on omega-3 fats has exploded, the name vitamin F never resurfaced. It’s too bad that the vitamin F nomenclature did not stick. That term alone would emphasize how essential these fats are to our body. As with vitamins, our body cannnot make these fats (or enough of them), so they are required in our diet.

After the discovery of omega-3 fats, 50 years passed until the first human case of omega-3 fat deficiency was identifi ed. A child too sick to eat was fed intravenously with a mixture that contained no omega-3 fats. Instead of getting better, the child got unexpectedly worse and displayed symptoms of numbness, tingling, weakness, inability to walk, leg pain, psychological disturbances, and blurred vision. Ralph T. Holman, an expert in omega-3 fats, identified the cause of the child’s problem as a deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids. His discovery put omega-3 fats on the map, beyond an esoteric research interest.

The incredible research into omega-3 fats within the context of their role as an essential vitamin helps to explain omega-3’s sweeping effects on health and disease. A new picture emerges of a nutrient deficiency that wreaks havoc in many different parts of the body, from the inner workings of the brain to the battlegrounds of immunity and inflammation.

Different Omega-3 Fats Affect Your Body in Different Ways

Just as there is more than one type of B vitamin (vitamins B₁, B₂, B₁₂,  and so forth), there is more than one type of omega-3 fatty acid. Each of these omega-3 fatty acids affects your body in different ways. The types of omega-3 fatty acids found in plant foods are very different from those found in fish. So if you are tanking up on plant sources of omega-3 fat, such as flax meal or flaxseed oil, you still could be deficient in the other omega-3 fats that are found primarily in fish. For example, many of the foods that boast of their omega-3 fat content are fortified with the plant form of omega-3 fat, not the types found in fish. This is not necessarily bad, but some consumers might be under the wrong impression that they are getting enough omega-3 fats when they are actually still deficient in certain types.

Note: Feel free to republish this article on your own blog or website but please copy paste the below ‘Author Credits’ and include it at the bottom of your post or page. Thank you. 

About The Author

Dr. Leroy Rebello is a well established and internationally qualified anti-aging consultant and cosmetologist from Mumbai and a director in Eternesse – the best anti aging clinic in Mumbai. He lectures in reputed Institutions such as AIIMS, JIPMER and other Medical Colleges around India. With over 10 Research Papers published in Indexed Journals, Dr. Rebello is continuously researching and developing new treatments and cures. 

 

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Formal Launch Of Eternesse Anti Aging Clinic at Marriott Mumbai

Dr. Sunita Banerji’s unveils “ETERNESSE Anti Aging Clinic” at the formal launch of the Anti Aging Clinic on the 17th of March at the JW Marriott Hotel in Mumbai. It was indeed an eternal affair with yesteryear’s Bollywood star Hema Malini in attendance looking like a diva and starting off the evening lighting a traditional diya.

Bhawana Somaya was the moderator for the evening and hosted the evening gracefully welcoming Dr. Sunita Banerji who went on to showcase a presentation on anti aging. Sunita who is also into philanthropic work  supported designer Amy Billimoria’s green eco-friendly signature wear by wearing her stunning gown created from recycled fabric.
Also in attendance was television actor Samir Soni and actress Neelam  Kothari, model and actor Sudanshu Pandey with wife. Actor Ranvir Shorey walked in and left early after congratulating Dr. Sunita Banerji. Dance Duo Sandip Soparkar and Jesse Randhawa, Kahkeshan Patel, Pria Kataria Puri, Siddharth Kak, Sumit Kaul, Bob Bhrahmbhatt, Bijon Dasgupta, Dr. Sanjay Arora. Suburban Diagnostic, our testing partner was the main sponsor for the evening. Dr. Sunita Banerji also announced Genetic Testing  and Neutrogenomics which is being launched in India for the first time. Singer Alka Yagnik and her brother Sameer Yagnik sang a song before the bar was announced open!

 

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